• Carl Schuricht conducts the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra performing Bruckner’s Symphony No.8 in C Minor

    Carl Schuricht conducts the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra performing Bruckner’s Symphony No.8 in C Minor

    Anton Bruckner’s Symphony No. 8 is the last symphony that the composer completed in full (he died before the final movement of the Symphony No. 9 was finished).

    This special interpretation by Carl Schuricht with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra represents Bruckner’s 8th in its true unrivalled glory.

  • Music for Viola & Cello Played By Herbert Downes & Jacqueline Du Pre

    Music for Viola & Cello Played By Herbert Downes & Jacqueline Du Pre

    Jacqueline Du Pre was born in Oxford and commenced learning the cello at the age of five with Alison Dalrymple, she then went on to study with William Pleeth at the age of ten. Only five years later she was enrolled to the Casals Master Class at Zermatt, Switzerland. She made her formal début at the Wigmore Hall in March 1961 accompanied by Ernest Lush. It was her concerto début in March 1962 at the Royal Festival Hall, performing the Elgar Cello Concerto that propelled her career into the stratosphere – bringing spontaneous critical enthusiasm followed by global recognition.

  • Yura Guller plays Frédéric Chopin – Mazurkas Favorites

    Yura Guller plays Frédéric Chopin – Mazurkas Favorites

    The origins of the Mazurka can be traced back to early Polish folk music and dance. Chopin wrote a total of sixty-nine of them for solo piano during his lifetime, the first of which were composed in 1825 and the last in 1849, the year of his death.

  • Yura Guller plays Frédéric Chopin – Nocturnes Favorites

    Yura Guller plays Frédéric Chopin – Nocturnes Favorites

    Yura Guller was born in 1895 in Marseille, France. She started to learn the piano at the age of five, giving recitals at a very early age before enrolling at the Paris Conservatoire at just nine years old. It is here that she studied under Isidor Philipp, a tutor of impeccable pedigree having studied with Camille Saint-Saëns, Théodore Ritter & Georges Amadée St. Claire Mathias (himself a direct pupil of Frédéric Chopin).

  • Carl Schuricht conducts the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra performing Bruckner’s Symphony No.9 in D Minor

    Carl Schuricht conducts the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra performing Bruckner’s Symphony No.9 in D Minor

    Bruckner’s Symphony No. 9 was written between 1893-1896 and was to be his last, the final movement remaining unfinished at point of his death in 1896. Bruckner’s Ninth Symphony is both unique and complex in style presenting the listener with many different patterns and themes, traits that can be found in nearly all of Bruckner’s Symphonies. Monumental in its form and design, a vast orchestral canvas and soundscape providing fertile ground for experimentation and harmonic counterpoint. It ranks as one of the most innovative symphonies to be composed in the 19th Century.

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Carl Schuricht conducts the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra performing Bruckner’s Symphony No.8 in C Minor

Anton Bruckner’s Symphony No. 8 is the last symphony that the composer completed in full (he died before the final movement of the Symphony No. 9 was finished).  Bruckner worked on the Symphony during breaks from his commitments at the Vienna Conservatory and University of Vienna and all four movements were competed in draft by the end of the summer in 1885.  It took a further two years to complete the orchestration of this monumental symphony.  After initial feedback from his close friend and conductor, Hermann Levi, Bruckner continued to work on the Symphony for a further three years before arriving at the final version in March 1890.  It was then both approved and financed for publication by Emperor Franz Joseph I of Austria, whom the symphony was dedicated to.  In late 1890 the publication was undertaken by Haslinger-Schlesinger-Lienau and finally published in March 1892, some eight years after Bruckner began work on it.

After a couple of cancellations of the premiere of the work by the young Felix Weingartner, who admitted the work was too difficult, it finally realised its public performance in December 1892 with Hans Richter conducting.  Many of the audience members left after each movement completed, including the famous critic Eduard Hanslick who later described it as “repellent”.  However there were supporters in the audience, including the likes of Hugo Wolf and Johann Strauss.

It was a very slow start for the symphony with scarce performances, with the American premiere taking place in 1909 and London premiere some 20 years later in 1929.  However over time the work has rightly found its place as one of the truly great symphonies of the 20th Century.

This special interpretation by Carl Schuricht with the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra represents Bruckner’s 8th in its true unrivalled glory.  Schuricht provides both awesome and dramatic control of the orchestra through the movements, allowing the  intellectual scope and greatness of the symphony to be fully revealed to the listener.  The tempo is fast but controlled, full of colour and expressive form that can be vacant in other interpretations.  A truly beautiful modern and dynamic interpretation of this symphonic masterpiece.

Original tape (1st Movement).

Original tape (2nd Movement).

Original tape (3rd Movement).

Original tape (4th Movement).

Original tape (detail).

Original tape (reverse box detail).

ERC sleeve proof.


ERC sleeve mounted front plate.

ERC sleeve mounted front plate (green print part).

ERC sleeve mounted front plate (red print part).