• Michèle Auclair & Marie-Claire Alain play Bach Six Sonatas for Violin and Keyboard, BWV 1014–1019

    Michèle Auclair & Marie-Claire Alain play Bach Six Sonatas for Violin and Keyboard, BWV 1014–1019

    These six sonatas were commonly played on the violin and harpsichord, and are rarely performed in this format; violin and organ. The organ sound decay and tempo affords more depth and expression to the work.

    This majestic and ethereal interpretation was originally released in 1957 on Les Discophiles Français (DF 209-210). Never before has this rare and iconic release been re mastered and cut in true mono from the original master tapes. Our unique cloth bound sleeve has been manufactured by hand with book binding material specifically sourced from Italy in order to match the original. The insert type has been fully letter-pressed from metal as was originally undertaken in the 1950s.

  • Leonid Kogan plays Mozart Violin Concerto No.3 & Mendelssohn Violin Concerto

    Leonid Kogan plays Mozart Violin Concerto No.3 & Mendelssohn Violin Concerto

    This release represents the last instalment of the six major stereo recordings that Leonid Kogan completed for Columbia. Although originally released in Mono only in the UK (Columbia 33CX 1744), in 1960 it was granted a commercial release in Stereo form (SAXF138) exclusively in the territory of France.

  • ERC041 John Lee Hooker - The Country Blues of John Lee Hooker

    ERC041 John Lee Hooker - The Country Blues of John Lee Hooker

    In 1959 John Lee Hooker was still releasing R&B-influenced electric blues with a rhythm section for Vee Jay Records when he recorded The Country Blues Of John Lee Hooker for Riverside Records; a welcome return to his original folk/traditional sound and a great example of one chord blues structure intermixed with Hookers unique vocal style.

  • ERC043 Gioconda De Vito Plays Bach's Violin Concerto and Mozart's Violin Concerto No. 3. Conducted by Rafael Kubelik

    ERC043 Gioconda De Vito Plays Bach's Violin Concerto and Mozart's Violin Concerto No. 3. Conducted by Rafael Kubelik

    By the early 1950’s De Vito was considered as Europe’s No.1 female violinist. Her expressive, improvisatory style of playing, slow vibrato and generous, warm phrasing, conveys a degree of emotional depth rarely encountered.

  • ERC Recreates Iconic Klemperer Beethoven Symphony Cycle Box Set

    ERC Recreates Iconic Klemperer Beethoven Symphony Cycle Box Set

    ERC have commenced the remastering of the complete Beethoven Symphonies and Overtures with the Philharmonia Orchestra conducted by Otto Klemperer. These legendary performances are being cut from the original master tapes in stereo over 13 discs on our Lyrec / Ortofon all valve vintage cutting system. For the first time all the Overtures will be included in the set; some of these have never been released in stereo.

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ERC041 John Lee Hooker - The Country Blues of John Lee Hooker

Born near Clarksdale, Mississippi on August 22, 1917 to a sharecropping family, John Lee Hooker‘s earliest musical influence came from his stepfather, William Moore — a blues musician who taught his young stepson to play the guitar, and whom John Lee later credited for his unique style on the instrument.

By the early 1940s, Hooker had moved north to Detroit by way of Memphis and Cincinnati. By day, he was a janitor in the auto factories, but by night, like many other transplants from the rural Delta, he entertained friends and neighbours by playing at house parties. Hooker honed the blues into something new – a grinding, hymnal vamp, which he finessed for all it was worth. Hooker’s essential sound dispensed with the usual 12-bar blues progression to throw the focus on the thrust of the rhythm. It’s deep groove music he made, with a sound as indebted to the beat as funk, and as enamoured of repetition as an incantation. In Hooker’s greatest recordings, repetition bred intensity, both in his guitar playing and in his vocals which, in their chanting, droning cadence, could reach the transcendence of devotional singing.

In 1959 John Lee Hooker was still releasing R&B-influenced electric blues with a rhythm section for Vee Jay Records when he recorded The Country Blues Of John Lee Hooker for Riverside Records; a welcome return to his original folk/traditional sound and a great example of one chord blues structure intermixed with Hookers unique vocal style. 

This mono session that we have remastered from the original master tapes can only be described as an almost near perfect recording. Although Hooker is most well known for his electric recordings few of these are as personal or as pure as this stripped down unplugged classic.  Due to the vast dynamic range between guitar and vocal the original pressing of this album was heavily compressed. This was presumably undertaken in order to cut at a hot level for the commercial mainstream market. We always resist this approach and have cut without processing through our true mono valve system allowing the listener to appreciate all the nuance and beauty of the performance as heard on the master tape.


Original master tape (front).

Original master tape (rear).

Letter press type, plate and furniture on quoin.

Letter press type, plate and furniture on quoin (detail).

Rear sleeve on press.